Great British Makers Campaign - winners announced

By Rosanna Holmes,
7th September 2012 - 14:29
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The hunt is over for Britain’s Most Creative Makers as Seek & Adore announced its nine winners this week after a hard day’s judging at the e-boutique’s HQ.

H&A editor Angela Linforth was on the judging panel along with jewellery designer Sian Evans and glassmaker Stuart Ackroyd. ‘We saw some terrific work in all nine categories,' she says. 'It’s great to see such a high standard of creativity and outright skill.’

 
The nine winners are:

Ceramics
Lisa Young, Dyfed 
Lisa combines modern graphic design with traditional throwing techniques to create quirky and contemporary pieces.
 
Innovation
Jenny Llewellyn
Jenny creates jewellery, pictured above, inspired by underwater life and mixes silicon with metal to striking effect. 
 
Glass
Cathryn Shilling
Cathryn impressed the judges with her innovative approach.
 
Wood
Hendzel & Hunt
Furniture makers with originality and quirk, these craftsmen use reclaimed and sustainable materials to create fresh and creative pieces.
 
Metal
Gordon Robertson
Gordon’s experience in fabrics and textile design are alive in his metal work, particularly his exquisite pewter platters, pictured.
 
Textiles
Woven Oak
Leo and Lizzie Hillier are a husband and wife team who use traditional block printing in their contemporary soft furnishing designs.
 
Jewellery
Grianne Morton
Grianne, who has been featured in H&A’s Antiques of the Future slot, collects materials and miniature bits and pieces to create unique jewellery that has a real feeling of nostalgia.
 
Freestyle
Wolfram Lohr
Wolfram Lohr stood out in this difficult-to-judge category with his well-designed and beautifully proportioned leather work.
 
Sustainability
Jennifer McDowell
Jennifer hand-turns wooden bowls from materials reclaimed from the furniture-making industry.
 
 
Finally, the award for Britain’s Favourite Designer-maker – as voted for by the public – went to Jennifer McDowell, for her reclaimed wooden bowls, and in second place was wood-turner Richard Shock.